Are Your Flats Too Flat?

December 24, 2017


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In everything in life there is an opposite; there is yin and yang, night and day, combs have brushes. When most think of flats they think of a happy alternative to heels. Flats are thought of as a safe haven for your feet or so most think.

There are flats that can be considered too flat and cause more harm than good. They don’t provide adequate arch support, cushioning or shock absorption, which all feet need especially those with flat feet. Without that support, you can get inflammation, tendonitis, heel pain, strains. Ballet flats or foldable flats are very common in lacking support.

Overcompensating with too much cushion, like certain running shoes for example, can be just as bad. When there is a lot of cushion, your brain is not getting the direct feedback from your foot because your sense of ground is thrown off which can cause stress injuries, especially to the heel.

Flips Flops are also on the caution list. Most are too flat, too thin and too open. This exposes the foot to the environment and doesn’t provide arch support or cushioning.

The thong that sits between your toes is also dangerous, it forces your toe muscles to over-grip. Plus, when your big toe hangs off the flip-flop, you increase your risk for toe fractures. The risk of getting splinters or other foot injuries is higher when the feet are exposed. People with diabetes should not wear flip-flops, because simple cuts and scrapes can lead to serious complications.

The solution is here.

For Flip Flops you can try fitted flip-flops for arch support, and the height of the sole better protects your foot from outside debris

If you love the look of ballet flats, over-the-counter inserts may help prevent mild foot pain. Heel pads can provide extra cushioning for achy heels. And custom orthotics can ease a whole range of foot pains and problems. Podiatrists prescribe these inserts to provide arch support and reduce pressure on sensitive areas. A trip to your podiatrist would be helpful to find out the pressure points on your foot or where you place most of your weight. If you want to avoid the doctor then possibly Dr. Scholl’s foot pads are available. If the pain is consistent no matter the insert, a trip to the podiatrist may be beneficial for your health. There may be something deeper than just back arch support.

Most common causes of foot pain – Caution ladies

Plantar fasciitis – an inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs between the heel and the arch of the foot

Plantar fasciitis (PF) is the most common cause of foot pain. It’s so common, in fact, that almost everyone will deal with a case of PF in his or her lifetime. Certain stressful exercises or constant standing, over-training, tight calf muscles, flat feet, high arches, weight gain, or jobs that require may increase the possibility of an inflammation. It is most common in middle-aged people men or women but anyone can get Plantar fasciitis is a very easy affliction if you are not conscience of the strain you put on your feet.

The pain can present as sharp, dull, aching, or burning. Classic symptoms to look out for:

– Notable heel pain or stiffness in the morning that recedes during the day.

– Pain that goes away when you exercise (as the muscles and ligaments get warm and stretchy) but comes back when you’re done working out.

– Increased pain when you climb stairs or stand on your toes.

– Pain after sitting or standing for an extended period.

The best ways to alleviate or hopefully avoid PF are stretches:

30-second stretches, five times a day.” Foot stretches may help, but it’s far more important to stretch your calf

Always stretch your feet, calves, and Achilles after a workout (or a long day on your feet).

Become aware of the strains you put on your feet.

– When going for distance, walk or run on soft surfaces.

– Alternate activities to prevent over-stressing the plantar fascia.

– Ice at the first hint of pain.

– Take rest days!

– Always wear supportive shoes (or over the counter inserts in your non-supportive shoes), whether or not you’re working out.

– Avoid long periods of barefoot walking or standing. Even at home, try slippers or comfy shoes.

– If you’ve recently gained weight, gotten pregnant, or started a new fitness routine, take extra care to support your feet. Sudden changes like these can increase your risk of plantar fasciitis.